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ISIS Beheading Executions & Praising Of Nice Terror

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Could ISIS Strike the West With Chemical Weapons?

France's prime minister has raised the terrifying specter of ISIS carrying out chemical or biological weapons attacks on the West, but international investigators have so far confirmed only a single use of mustard gas by the terror gang in the Middle East.

The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which enforces a global treaty, announced earlier this month that it had determined with "utmost confidence" that a "non-state actor" used the outlawed agent outside Aleppo, Syria, in August, likely killing a baby.

U.S. intelligence officials told NBC News that ISIS was the non-state actor. The OPCW is continuing to investigate other suspected uses of chemical weapons by ISIS.

ISIS trackers say its current arsenal includes weapons that are easily scavenged: mustard gas in Syria, which stockpiled hundreds of tons before agreeing to dispose of it two years ago, and chlorine that could be obtained from any water treatment facility in territory it has seized.

That seemed to be confirmed in a Tumblr post in August by high-profile ISIS fighter Israfil Yilmaz.

"It’s only acceptable when the regime or any other group uses chemical warfare against us?" he wrote.

"The regime uses chemical warfare on a regular basis these days, and nobody bats an eye — yet when IS captures it from them and uses it against them it’s all of a sudden a huge problem?

"Fight them the way they fight you."

The Associated Press reported Thursday that Iraqi and American intelligence officials believe ISIS is hell-bent on ramping up a chemical weapons program with help of scientists in the territory that forms its so-called caliphate.

An Iraqi politician, citing intelligence reports, told the AP that ISIS has recruited chemical experts Chechnya, Southeast Asia and Iraq, including some who once worked for Saddam Hussein. NBC News has not been able to confirm that assessment.

It's a nightmare scenario, as illustrated by French Prime Minister Manuel Valls' warning to Parliament that bullets and bombs could be replaced by something less tangible but just as deadly.

"We must not rule anything out," Valls said.

But intelligence officials in Washington caution that intent is a far cry from capability, particularly when it comes to more sophisticated weapons like nerve gas.

"We know they are pursuing chemical weapons, but we haven't seen anything beyond mustard and chlorine," said Patrick Martin, an Iraq expert with the Institute for the Study of War, a military research think tank in Washington.

He said that even with mustard gas, the damage has been limited because it's essentially just added to warheads and mortars.

"They don't deploy it on wide scales," Martin said. "Their delivery systems aren't that sophisticated."

But does ISIS have the ability to develop weapons that would pose a threat to the West going forward?

Martin said that's still unclear.

"Mosul [seized by ISIS in June] has a university and that theoretically has the lab facilities to deal with this. The difficulty they may face is in obtaining the raw materials," he said.

Retired Lt. Gen Richard Zahner, a former top military intelligence officer in Iraq, said that while al Qaeda was never able to launch a chemical weapons program, ISIS has greater financial resources.

"Even a few competent scientists and engineers, given the right motivation and a few material resources, can produce hazardous industrial and weapons-specific chemicals in limited quantities," he told the AP.

And the U.S. military has noted that ISIS has been able to lure scientists to its side. In January, U.S. Central Command announced that an airstrike had killed Abu Mailk, a chemical expert who had worked under Saddah Hussein.

"His death is expected to temporarily degrade and disrupt the terrorist network and diminish ISIL's (ISIS') ability to potentially produce and use chemical weapons against innocent people," the statement said.

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Father 'driven to suicide after he was wrongly accused of being a paedophile on Facebook'

The grieving family of a man found hanged in a cemetery claim he was driven to suicide following paedophile accusations on Facebook.

Steven Rudderham, 48, was traumatised when his name, address and photograph were published online, along with a message calling him a 'dirty perv' and claiming he was a paedophile.

Within 15 minutes, the message had been shared hundreds of times and the bricklayer from Hull, East Yorkshire, began receiving death threats on Facebook, an inquest heard.

He was found hanged in the city's Hessle cemetery three days later.

Mr Rudderham's daughter Bethany Beaumont, 19, said: 'They've destroyed an innocent life for no reason.

'It was disgusting. It was slander.'

His mother Carol Matthews said: 'I want to know why someone did something like that. I hope they rot in hell. It took a person's life. We will never get over it.'

Police have confirmed they are considering an investigation into the Facebook posts in the days leading up to Mr Rudderham's death. A Humberside Police spokeswoman said no one had made any allegations of a sexual nature against him.

Yesterday's inquest heard Mr Rudderham was working towards examinations as a building site manager before the internet accusations.

He normally saw Ms Beaumont every day and she realised immediately the profound effect the paedophile accusations had on him.

She said: 'He just couldn't believe it. He was just looking at the wall and he wouldn't eat. It was like someone had ripped his life apart.'

Mr Rudderham was afraid of walking the streets in case he was spotted and decided to stay with his daughter to prevent him being targeted at his home.

Ms Beaumont told the Hull inquest even people who had known her father for years joined in the cyber bullying.

She said: 'There were people who had known him for years commenting on it, he was so upset. I had never seen him like that.

'He stayed at my house that night because of what the comments were saying, about people coming to his house and smashing it up.'

On Saturday, January 26, his body was found by a member of the public.

Police were called at about 2pm but Mr Rudderham was pronounced dead at the scene.

A memory stick was recovered on his body and police have also seized a computer hard drive.

Mr Rudderham had discussed giving police a memory stick with evidence about the accusations on it in the days before his death.

Mr Rudderham's mother was told of her son's death on her birthday and puts the blame solely on her son's Facebook accusers.

She said: 'I went berserk when I found out what had happened, he didn't want to stay in his house because he was frightened.'

Mr Rudderham's family say he served time in HMP Hull in 2010 for fighting but had no convictions for sex offences.

Dr Latifu Sanni was also told about the paedophile accusations made against Mr Rudderham before he carried out the post-mortem.

The inquest heard there had been no evidence of medical depression in the months before his death. No drugs and no significant amounts of alcohol were found by a post-mortem.

The inquest was attended by his family, including his mother and stepfather David Matthews, his sister Lisa Elm and daughters Bethany, Anna and Danielle Beaumont.

Recording a verdict of suicide, Coroner Paul Marks said: 'The medical cause of death was hanging.

'He was actively pursuing a qualification to improve his status and job prospects. In the last few days of his life, he received a pejorative message on a social networking site which greatly troubled him.'

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Feminism, by creating artificial scarcity of sexual resources, is responsible for much of the deadly infighting among men, as well as male suicides.

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Scientists in China conduct 'successful' head transplant on rat

Scientists in China claim to have conducted a successful head transplant on a rat.

Controversial surgeon Sergio Canavero and colleague Xiaoping Ren attached the head of a smaller rat onto a larger one while maintaining the brain activity of the donor.

A third rat was used to keep up blood pressure on the rats being operated on, which otherwise would have been catastrophic and killed the animals.

The experiment was repeated on a number of other rats. Most only survived for around 36 hours after the procedure.

But it was hailed as a success by Dr Canavero because its goal was to avoid major blood loss.

Images of the rats appear to show the donor’s front paws and head stitched to the upper neck of the recipient rat.

Dr Canavero has previously conducted a similar experiment on a dog, in which its spinal cord was severed, but it is unknown how long it survived for.

Last year, he claimed to have successfully carried out a head transplant on a monkey, which survived for 20 hours before being euthanised for ethical reasons.

Despite the poor survival rate of the rats, Dr Canavero maintained the experiment was a crucial step forward towards head transplants on humans.

But other neurosurgeons have disputed this claim. Responding to the dog experiment, neuroscientist at Case Western Reserve University Jerry Silver told the New Scientist: “These papers do not support moving forward in humans.”

Dr Canavero has announced he and Dr Xiaoping will attempt to carry out the first head transplant later this year in Harbin, China.

He first announced his intention to carry out the procedure in 2013 and has been encouraged by his latest success.

A Russian man with the degenerative Werdnig-Hoffman's disease named Valery Spiridonov was going to undergo the procedure but Dr Canavero has now said a Chinese citizen will undergo the process.

In a statement, Dr Canavero said a “high number of volunteers from all over the world came forward”.

He added: “The final decision is only made immediately prior to the operation, as it also depends on the body donor, who has to be compatible with the receiver in many ways.”

Other scientists have strongly criticised the plan.

"I would not wish this on anyone," said Dr Hunt Batjer, the president of the American Association for Neurological Surgeons, in 2015. "I would not allow anyone to do it to me as there are a lot of things worse than death."

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